Music and Disability Events at SMT 2017 in Arlington

The SMT Interest Group on Music and Disability invites all interested SMT members to join us from 12:15 to 1:45 on Friday November 3rd in Studio E of the Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel for our annual group meeting. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

We will begin with a short business meeting that will last no more than fifteen minutes. This will then be followed by an informal seminar on The Intersections of Sound Studies and Disability Studies in Music that will last from 12:30 until approximately 1:45. We will be led for this seminar by noted authors Mara Mills (NYU) and Jonathan Sterne (McGill University) who will be joining us from The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin where they are presently co-authoring a book on the history of time stretching and pitch shifting technology. Professors Mills and Sterne will be joining us via Skype. Sumanth Gopinath (University of Minnesota) and Jennifer Iverson (University of Chicago) will be our respondents, on site.

In preparation for this seminar, we ask that you read two short essays from the volume Keywords in Sound Studies: Chapter 4 (Mills) “Deafness,” and Chapter 6 (Sterne) “Hearing.” In addition, please also consider reading the recent essay “Dismediation: Three Proposals and Six Tactics,” co-authored by Mills and Sterne.

You can access these readings here:

Deafness: https://drive.google.com/open…

Hearing: https://drive.google.com/open…

Dismediation: https://drive.google.com/open…

Following the seminar, we will be holding an informal meet-and-greet happy hour from 5–6 p.m.

 

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Results of the Poll

Dear Esteemed Colleagues,

I’m writing to announce the results of our online poll for the AMS Music and Disability Study Group (AMS MDSG). Thank you to everyone who voted.

Firstly, our by-laws were passed unanimously. Thank you. These are always view them on the MDSG WordPress blog, on the left-hand column.

Secondly, the theme of next year’s special session at AMS Rochester will be on the intersections of music, disability, race, gender, and other related studies. This was overwhelmingly the most-requested focus. Other suggestions include to hire a guest speaker, and to have a poster session. I will be discussing these suggestions and any others you would like to send my way with my new co-chair and the other new leadership members.

Thirdly, I am happy to announce the new leadership joining myself, Jeannette Jones, and Michael Accinno this year. Jessica Holmes will be joining me as fellow co-chair, Beth Keyes will join as Secretary/Treasurer, and Michael will remain as social media officer. There were no additional nominations that were accepted, so these are the results of our election. Additionally, James Deaville has volunteered to assist Michael with the blog as Blog Editor and to help us solicit regular blog posts. Jeannette Jones will stay on as chair of the ad-hoc accessibility committee, but is working to transition this committee to be under the umbrella of the official AMS Board rather than just the study group. The terms will for leadership will continue to be for three years, and there will be new votes as needed. We encourage other members of the study groups to volunteer their services. The next votes will be in 2018, when I will transition off as chair, and Michael will transition off as social media officer.

We will publish bios for the returning and new officers of the MDSG, and would also like to publish bios for the returning and new officers of the MDIG (Music and Disability Interest Group of the SMT).

Thank you so much for your contributions to the poll, and for your continued work in our shared fields of interest within music studies. Please do not hesitate to e-mail me with any questions or concerns.

Very Best,

Samantha Bassler, Co-Chair, AMS Music and Disability Study Group,

with the leadership:

Jessica Holmes, Co-Chair

Michael Accinno, Social Media Officer

Beth Keyes, Secretary and Treasurer

James Deaville, Blog Editor

Jeannette Jones, Chair of the Ad-Hoc Accessibility Committee

CFP: Cripping the Music Theory/Music History Curriculum at AMS/SMT in Vancouver

CFP: Cripping the Music Theory/Music History Curriculum
Special session of the AMS and SMT groups on Music and Disability, AMS and SMT Joint Conference in Vancouver, 3–6 November 2016

The Oxford Handbook on Music and Disability Studies (2015) demonstrates how disability studies is a lens to understand music and cultural studies throughout music history, and how music and disability informs analyses of music. The book brings music and disability studies to a wider audience of music scholarship, and many contributors have entertained questions from peers who wish to bring music and disability into general music courses.

The AMS Study Group and SMT Interest Group on Music and Disability will sponsor a special session on music pedagogy and disability at the 2016 joint conference in Vancouver. We seek proposals on new ways to integrate music and disability as a common perspective within the standard core curriculum in music history and music theory, rather than relegate music and disability to special topics and seminar courses. We seek presentations from colleagues who already utilize this perspective in their routine teaching responsibilities, and we welcome submissions from younger scholars who would like to workshop their ideas for syllabi. We encourage submissions in a variety of formats, including duo presentations, short position papers, longer research papers, workshops, interviews, demonstrations, testimonials, videos, Skype presentations, surveys, and more.

Proposals should clearly describe (1) the argument you will make or the information you will convey, (2) the format you will use, and (3) the estimated duration of your presentation. Please limit proposals to 250 words. Send proposals to disability.and.music@gmail.com no later than 4 April 2016. Submissions (with identifying information removed) will be read by the organizers and chairs of the AMS and SMT music and disability study group and interest group: Samantha Bassler and Bruce Quaglia.

CFP (journal): Special issue on disability and design, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

Issue 8 of The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

Special Topic: Disability as Insight, Access as the Function of Design

Issue Editors: Sushil K. Oswal, University of Washington

Andrew J. Lucchesi, The Graduate Center, CUNY

JITP welcomes work that explores critical and creative uses of interactive technology in teaching, learning, research, and the workplace. For this issue, we invite submissions from both senior and emerging scholars under the linked themes of disability and access as generative focuses for technological design and pedagogical innovation.

In this issue of JITP, rather than approaching disability as a problem to be solved, we seek proposals for projects that imagine, explore, and underscore the positive gains to be had by embracing disability perspectives on accessible designs. We draw on Elizabeth Sanders and Pieter Jan Stappers’s conception of future-minded generative design research and ask contributors to propose projects that would inform and inspire future designers, teachers, and researchers to shape digital tools, methodologies, and environments which de-center ableistic visions of technology, composing processes, curricular content, and access itself.

We request proposals for critical narratives that underscore the contributions disability makes in stretching the boundaries of design while asserting a central place for accessibility, inclusivity, and bodily difference. We also welcome topics that challenge or reconceptualize the traditional notions of assistive technologies and accessible designs whether or not they necessarily address the topic from the perspective of Disability Studies. Rhetorical analysis of technology, accessibility, and disability can also be a productive area of exploration.

Submit inquiries to oswal@u.washington.edu and alucchesi@gc.cuny.edu.

Suggested topics may include but are not limited to:

  • What does it mean to compose multimodally with accessibility in view as a person with or without disability? What might it look like to design inclusive user interactions in social virtual spaces? What complexity, creativity, or obfuscations are visible in today’s social media compositions at the intersections of gender, race, and disability?
  • What novel disability and accessibility scholarship projects have been made, or are possible by virtual Social Networks? What new knowledge is possible through assistive-technology-related disability and accessibility research for universal users?
  • Besides the functional innovations, what possibilities for play and improvisation are possible through assistive technologies and related research? How do such play and improvisation stabilize existing knowledge and directionally change the generation of new knowledge?
  • Development of assistive technology tools or applications for “mainstream” purposes; rhetorics of assistive technologies; rhetorical histories of assistive technologies morphing into “mainstream” products; rhetorics of, or analyses of, consumer mobile technologies as assistive technologies; visions of assistive technologies for able-bodied users.
  • Analyses of new models of Universal Design; benefits and/or analyses of disabled-centered participatory designs; position papers on innovative, crowd-sourced designs by and for the disabled.
  • Generative research methods for evaluating accessible designs, products, and pedagogies; profiles or analyses of digital tools for disability activism, or community building ; or experiments in fostering accessibility in learning, work, and research environments in college and beyond.

We invite both textual and multimedia submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the proposed submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials.

All JITP submissions are subject to an open peer review process. The expected length for finished manuscripts is under 5,000 words. Proposals received that do not fall under the special topic topic but do fall under JITP’s broader themes will still be considered for publication in Issue 8.

Important Dates

Submission deadline for this Fall 2015 Issue is April 15, 2015. When submitting using our Open Journal Systems software, under “Journal Section,” please select the section titled “Issue 8: Special Issue.”  Submission instructions are below.

About the Journal

All work appearing in the Issues section of JITP is reviewed by the issue editors and independently by two scholars in the field, who provide formative feedback to the author(s) during the review process. We intend that the journal itself—both in our process and in our digital product—serve as an opportunity to reveal, reflect on, and revise academic publication and classroom practices. All submissions for this special issue will be considered for our “Behind the Seams” feature, in which we publish dynamic representations of the revision and editorial processes, including reflections from the authorial and editorial participants.

Research-based submissions should include discussions of approach, method, and analysis.  When possible, research data should be made publicly available and accessible via the Web and/or other digital mechanisms, a process that JITP can and will support as necessary.  Successes and interesting failures are equally welcome (although see the Teaching Fails section below for an alternative outlet). Submissions that focus on pedagogy should balance theoretical frameworks with practical considerations of how new technologies play out in both formal and informal educational settings. Discipline-specific submissions should be written for non-specialists.

As a courtesy to our reviewers, we will not consider simultaneous submissions, but we will do our best to reply to you within two to three months of the submission deadline. All work should be original and previously unpublished. Essays or presentations posted on a personal blog may be accepted, provided they are substantially revised; please contact us with any questions at editors@jitpedagogy.org.

Video from Recasting Music: Body, Mind, Ability

Our special session at AMS/SMT Milwaukee 2014 included six short papers, three respondents, and lots of engaging conversation. Video of the introduction and first three talks is posted below, though due to a technical glitch, we unfortunately didn’t capture video for the rest of the session. Text versions of the later papers are linked where available.

Introduction (Jennifer Iverson)

Joseph N. Straus, “Hearing Voices”  


Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, “American Opera and Disability: The Case of Moby-Dick

Tobin Siebers, respondent. Discussion.


Performance (8:45–9:30)
Michael Bakan, “From Pathology to Neurodiversity: Music, Autism, and Ethnography”
Blake Howe“Enforcing and Recasting Disability through Music”
Andrew Dell’Antonio and Elizabeth Grace, respondents.


Vocality (9:30–10:30)
Jennifer Iverson“The Disabled Body in Babbitt’s Philomel and Wishart’s Red Bird
Jessica Holmes, “Sensing and Expressing Voice in Christine Sun Kim’s Face Opera II
Tobin Siebers, Andrew Dell’Antonio, and Elizabeth Grace, respondents. Discussion

CFP: Panel “Disabling Music Pedagogy” at Society for Disability Studies

CFP: Panel “Disabling Music Pedagogy” at Society for Disability Studies
June 10-13 2015, Atlanta, Georgia

For this panel, we are interested in cross-disciplinary interpretations of how music pedagogy exists in relationship to the experience of disability and how that relationship might be transformed. Areas considered might include current pedagogical standards in music education, music therapy, or occupational therapy more broadly. We encourage papers that consider how mainstream standards and conceptions of musicianship impact the scholastic endeavors of disabled students, particularly in regard to pedagogical techniques that evolved in the 19th century. We are also interested in papers that consider how best to approach the subject of disability in a music history seminar, music theory class, or general humanities class. Finally, we invite papers that explore the issue of disclosure in the music classroom, and how the choice to disclose or not might impact the pedagogical approaches available for teaching and learning music. Possible topics might include but are not limited to:

  • How mainstream pedagogical approaches reflect broader definitions of what it means to be a musician or to create beautiful music
  • How pedagogical approaches serve in maintaining or subverting able-bodied privilege
  • The impact of aesthetics on music education and assessment
  • How conceptions undergirding various pedagogical approaches might be observed in or related to music literature, such as opera, chamber music, or other genres.
  • How the use of music in therapeutic settings relates to the medical model of disability

More broadly, we are interested in exploring how pedagogy can be employed in ways that honor the scholastic autonomy of scholars with disabilities by expanding ways in which foundational musicianship is taught, learned, and conceived. Abstracts of approximately 300 words should be submitted no later than December 3, 2014. Please include your name, institutional affiliation, contact information, and abstract in an attached pdf file. Abstracts should be sent to the organizing committee via Meghan Schrader: meghanschrader (at) hotmail.com .

DISMUS Business and Recasting Music: Body, Mind, Ability

The business meeting/happy hour is in the Monarch Lounge from 5-6 p.m. Saturday Nov. 8. An agenda is available here: DISMUS 2014 meeting agenda. Then join us for a special session with six short papers, three respondents, and lots of engaging conversation. Saturday Nov. 8, 8-10:30 p.m., H: Juneau

Representation (8:00–8:45)
Joseph N. Straus, “Hearing Voices”
Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, “American Opera and Disability: The Case of Moby-Dick
Tobin Siebers, respondent. Discussion.


Performance (8:45–9:30)
Michael Bakan, “From Pathology to Neurodiversity: Music, Autism, and Ethnography”
Blake Howe“Enforcing and Recasting Disability through Music”
Andrew Dell’Antonio and Elizabeth Grace, respondents.


Vocality (9:30–10:30)
Jennifer Iverson“The Disabled Body in Babbitt’s Philomel and Wishart’s Red Bird
Jessica Holmes, “Sensing and Expressing Voice in Christine Sun Kim’s Face Opera II
Tobin Siebers, Andrew Dell’Antonio, and Elizabeth Grace, respondents. Discussion